EAST ALEUTIAN ISLANDS BOROUGH
&
West Aleutian Islands Census Area
POPULATED PLACES

Adak

Name derived from Adak Island; published in 1951 by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Located at the head of Kuluk Bay, on the northeast coast of Adak Island

Akutan

Name derived from Akutan Island and published in 1869 by George Davidson, U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS). 1914 (Ricks, 1965, p. 2). Located on the N shore of Akutan Harbor, E coast of Akutan Island, Krenitzin Islands.

Amchitka

No information available. On USGS Rat Islands B-4 map.

Atka

Pop. 119. Named for Atka Island. Reported as "Atkha" by Schwatka (1885, p. 115) , USA. Recorded in 1880 as "Nazan," with a population of 236, by Petroff (10th U.S. Census, 1884, p. 16). A post office was maintained 1938-57 Located on Nazan Bay, on E coast of Atka Island.

Attu

Aleut village listed in the 1880 census with 107 people; 101 in 1890; 2 1930; and 44 in 1940. The 1944 Aleutian Coast Pilot relates that this village was mostly destroyed in 1943 in connection with U. S. military operations against the Japanese. The U.S. military forces referred to the village as "Chichagof" at that time. Located on NW shore of Chichagof Harbor, on NE coast of Attu Island

Belkofski

Pop. 57. Aleut village reported in 1847 on Russian Hydrog, Dept. Chart 1379 as "S(elo) Belkovskoe" from "belka," meaning "squirrel." Its population was 102 in 1833; 268 in 1880; 185 in 1890; 147 in 1900; 129 in 1920; 123 in 1930; 140 in discontinued in 1951. Located on S coast of Alaska Peninsula, 27 mi. E of village of Cold Bay.

Biorka

In 1790 Martin Sauer recorded the Aleut name "Sidankin"; in 1826 Lieutenant Sarichev (map 14 dated 1792), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), published "S(elo) Sedanka" or "Sedanka Village"; Father Veniaminov (1840, v. 1, p. 185) wrote the Aleut name "Uguyug". In 1888 U.S. Bureau of Fisheries (USBF) recorded "Burka", which Baker (1906 p. 133) published "Bioka", "from the Norwegian Bjerk O or Swedish Bjork O, meaning Birch Island." Located on the north coast of Sedanka Island in the Fox Islands, 13 miles southeast of Unalaska village.

Cheerful (historical)

Translation of a Russian name published by Lieutenant Sarichev (1826, map 14, dated 1792), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN) as "Sel o Vysylovskoe," meaning "Cheerful village." Old village site at Cape Cheerful, on N coast of Unalaska Island.

Chernofski

Pop. 5. Lieutenant Sarichev (1826, map 14), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), published the name of this former Aleut village as "Sel(o) Chernovskoe" or "Chernofski Village." Baker (1906 , p. 173) says, "In 1831 it consisted of 4 huts (yourts) and 44 people." The population was 70 in 1874; 101 in 1880; 78 in 1890. A US Weather Bureau station was located here during World War II. Located on Mailboast Cove, Chernofski Harbor, on W coast of Unalaska Island

Cold Bay

Local name derived from Cold Bay. This village is located near the site of Fort Randall. A post office was established there in 1954 (Ricks, 1965, p.14). Located on the Alaska Peninsula, W shore of Cold Bay, 36 mi NE of the village of False Pass at the E end of Unimak Island.

Dutch Harbor

Pop. 52. Name published by USGS in 1931. Located on Amaknak I., on shore of Dutch Harbor, on Unalaska Bay, Unalaska Island.
Touristy Description: Situated between the Pacific Ocean to the South and the Bering Sea to the North, the Aleutian Island community of Unalaska/Dutch Harbor is rich in history, and for the last twenty years has been the number one commercial fishing port in the country.

Unalaska’s earliest known inhabitants, the Unangan (also know as Aleut) people have continuously occupied these islands for approximately 9,000 years. Artifacts from archaeological digs as well as other cultural items and information can be viewed at the Museum of the Aleutians and at the Ounalashka Corporation office.

Unalaska was established as the first headquarters for the Russian-American Fur Company and cornerstone for the lucrative sea otter fur trade in the early 1820’s. Unalaska’s most prominent landmark, the Russian Orthodox Cathedral of the Holy Ascension of Christ, which was completed in 1896 is the oldest cruciform style cathedral in North America, and is the only remaining indication of the Russian era which began in the mid-1700’s. Overlooking the bay, the church with its onion domes is a photographer’s delight. It is the repository for more than 600 Russian Orthodox icons, books and relics, and is the centerpiece of the community for the descendants of the Unangan/Aleuts that still call Unalaska home.

The impact of WWII in the Aleutians remains one of the most visible features that dot this remote landscape today. Quonset huts, barracks, concrete bunkers and former gun emplacements blend with Unalaska/Dutch Harbor’s modern physical features, providing visitors with a unique opportunity to explore this part of United States history. Less visible but not less important, was the impact on the people of the region. Their plight of being relocated from the islands after the June 1942 bombing by the Japanese and the difficulties they faced upon their return can be discovered by visiting the Aleutian WWII Visitor Center, the Ounalashka Corporation office, and the Museum of the Aleutians.

Unalaska and its International Port of Dutch Harbor sit in the heart of the North Pacific and Bering Sea fisheries. Its status as the only natural deep water port in the Aleutians has made it an important port since the 18th century when the Russian fur traders first sailed here. In the 1920’s and 1930’s, numerous Herring and Cod salteries and several Salmon canneries were active on Unalaska Island. After WWII, the King Crab fishery in the Bering Sea began to develop slowly and the first crab processing plants opened in Unalaska in the 1960’s. The development of the Bering Sea Red King Crab fishery in the 1970’s and 1980’s changed the character of Unalaska from a quiet village of 400 people to a boom town of approximately 4,000. In the mid-1980’s the current Pollock/Pacific Cod fisheries began to build large processing plants in Unalaska and are now the nation’s largest and most valuable fishery. Dutch Harbor is the main delivery port for the crab fleet featured on the Discovery Channel’s hit reality show “The Deadliest Catch.”

Besides the history, cultural opportunities and beautiful scenery, visitors come to Unalaska/Dutch Harbor to play outdoors. These treeless/bear less islands provide many outdoor activities including, but certainly not limited to: hiking, skiing, sportfishing, kayaking, bird/wildlife watching, and wildflowers (including several wild orchids).

Egorkovskoi

Marcus Baker (1906, p. 615) says that this Aleut village was destroyed in rebuilt in Inanudak bay and is, presumably the Nikolski village of to-day." Formerly located near Cape Tanak, on N coast of Umnak Island.

False Pass

An early English name for Isanotski Strait. The strait was called "False Pass" because it was thought to be impassable at the north end. A cannery was built which provided the nucleus of the settlement. A post office was established in 1921. Located on Isanotski Strait, on the E coast of Unimak Island

Hachimuk (historical)

Former Aleut village reported as "uninhabited" by Hodge (1907, p. 519), Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE). Located on Agattu I. in the Near Islands.

Hammerhead

Name published by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) in 1963 on Chart 9119. Located on SW shore of Sweeper Cove, Kuluk Bay, on NE coast of Adak Island.

Hamnulik (historical)

Former Aleut village reported as "uninhabited" by Hodge (1907, p. 529), Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE). Located on Agattu I., in the Near Islands.

Hapkug (historical)

Former Aleut village reported as "uninhabited" by Hodge (1907, p. 532), Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE). Located on Agattu I. in Near Islands.

Happy Valley

Name published by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USC&GS) in 1963 on Chart 9119. Located between Mitt Lake and Sweeper Cove on NE coast of Adak Island.

Herendeen Bay

On the Alaska Peninsula at the E end of Mine Harbor 90 mi. NE of Fort Randall.

Higtiguk (historical)

Former Aleut village reported as uninhabited by Hodge (1907, p. 549), Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE). Located on Agattu I. in the near Islands.

Hilksuk (historical)

Former Aleut village reported as uninhabited by Hodge, (1907, p. 549) Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE). Located on Agattu I. in the Near Islands.

Hospital Valley

Name published by U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (USGS) in 1963 Chart 9119. Located between Lake Leone and Sweeper Cove, on NE Adak Island.

Ikatan

Name derived from Ikatan Peninsula, published in 1949 on a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) map. Located on Ikatan Peninsula near head of Ikatan Bay, Unimak Island.

Imagnee (historical)

Former Aleut village reported by Father Vemiaminov (1840, v. 1, p. 184) as "Imagninskoe" with a population of 32 in 1830. The 1880 Census listed it as "Imagnak" with 34 people. Lieutenant Sarichev (1826, map 14), on Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), a 1790 map, gives the village name as "Sinagyna." Located on Summer Bay on E shore of Unalaska Bay, Unalaska Island.

Imik (historical)

Former Aleut village reported as "uninhabited" by Hodge (1907, p. 600), Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE). Located on Agattu Island in Near Islands.

Iptugik (historical)

Former Aleut village reported as "uninhabited" by Hodge (1907, p. 615), Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE). Located on Agattu Island in the Near Islands.

Kamuksusik (historical)

Former Aleut village reported as "uninhabited" by Hodge (1907, p. 649), Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE). Located on Agattu Island in Near Islands

Kaslukug (historical)

Former Aleut village reported as "uninhabited" by Hodge (1907, p. 663), Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE). Located on Agattu I. in Near Islands.

Kigsitatok (historical)

Was located on Agattu Island

Kikchik (historical)

former Aleut village reported as "uninhabited" by Hodge (1907, p. 687), Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE). Located on Agattu Island in Near Islands.

Kikun (historical)

former Aleut village reported as "uninhabited" by Hodge (1907, p. 687), Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE). Located on Agattu Island in the Near Islands.

Kimituk (historical)

No information available on location.

King Cove

Pop. 290, named for its founder, this fishing village has a salmon cannery and a school (Colby, 1939, p. 331); a post office was established in 1914 (Ricks, 1965, p. 34). Located between King Cove and King Cove Lagoon, 18 mi. SE of village of Cold Bay, on SW coast of Alaska Peninsula.

Kitak (historical)

former Aleut village reported as "uninhabited" by Hodge (1907, p. 705), Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE). Located on Agattu Island in the Near Islands.

Korovinki (historical)

Former Aleut village, called "Nikolskoi" by Captain F. P. Lutke, Imperial Russian Navy (IRN); residents moved to a site of Nazan Bay, an abandoned village, located on N shore of Korovin Bay, Atka Island

Kuptagok (historical)

Former Aleut village reported as cuninhabited" by Hodge (1907, p. 736), Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE). Located on Agattu Island in Near Islands.

Makushin

No information available. Located on USGS Unalaska C-3 map.

Marunich (historical)

Elliott (1881, St. Paul notes) wrote "Maroonitch, the site of a pioneer village, established by one Maroon." Located just SE of North Point, on N coast of Saint Paul Island.

Morzhovoi

Name published in 1847 on Chart 1379 of the Russian Hydrographic Dept. as "S(elo) Morzhovskoe," (Walrus Village). Located on S shore of Traders Cove, on Bechevin Bay.

Mukugnuk (historical)

Former Aleut village reported as cuninhabited" by Hodge (1907, p. 955), Bureau of American Ethnology (BAE). Description: "on Agattu I. in Near Islands.

Navy Town

Named during the military occupation of the island in World War II; published in 1948 by Army Map Service (AMS). Located on SE coast of Attu Island., on W shore of Massacre Bay

Nelson Lagoon

On a spit between Nelson Lagoon and Bristol Bay, 38 km (24 mi) W of Port Moller.

Nikolski

Pop. 92. Russian name published in 1868 by the U.S. Navy Hydrographic Office. Recorded in 1834 as "Recheshnoe," meaning "River," population 83, by Father Veniaminov (1840, v. 1, p. 151). Shown as "Nikolsky" on Petroff's 1880 Census map, and recorded with a population of 127; population 94 in 1890. The population was 94 in 1890; 109 in 1929; 97 in 1939; and 64 in 1950. Located on Nikolski Bay, on SW coast of Umnak Island.

Nosovskoi (historical)

Russian name reported in 1828 by Captain Lutke. Its precise location is not known. Description: site of a village, 6 mi. NW of Scotch Cap, on SW coast of Unimak Island.

Pauloff Harbor

No information available. Located on USGS False Pass B-3 map.

Port Moller

Pop. 33. Named for the bay; site of a cannery since about 1916. A post office was maintained here from 1952 to 1955. The native village at Port Moller was called Mashikh by I. Petroff in the 10th census in 1880.
Located on Entrance Point, Alaska Peninsula

Pribilof Islands

The Pribilofs are a four-island archipelago marooned in the Bering Sea, 300 miles from Alaska's mainland and 200 miles north of Dutch Harbor. While little more than treeless, tundra-covered hills, the shoreline and cliffs of St. Paul and St. George Islands are teaming with wildlife, making these two islands an unlikely tourist attraction. Two small communities, one on each island – St. Paul, population 450, and St. George population 112 - are the world’s largest indigenous Aleut villages and provide services to the trickle of wildlife enthusiasts that make their way out to the middle of Bering Sea.

The Pribilof Islands host the largest gathering of marine mammals in the world. Meanwhile, the islands' dizzying ocean cliffs are home to extensive bird rookeries. More than 2.5 million seabirds, ranging from common murres and crested auklets to tufted puffins and cormorants, nest on the Pribilofs, particularly St. George, making this the largest seabird colony in the Northern Hemisphere. It's easy to reach the cliffs to photograph the birds; more than 230 species are sighted during the summer, while blinds have been erected on beaches to observe northern fur seals, Steller sea lions, walruses and sea otters.
Although the Aleuts traveled to the Pribilofs seasonally for hunting, the islands were uninhabited when Russian fur trader Gavrill Pribylov arrived at St. George Island in 1786. For two years the Russian American Company enslaved and relocated Aleuts from Siberia, Atka, and Unalaska to the Pribilofs to hunt fur seals; today’s island residents are descendants. Already severely over harvested, fur seal numbers crashed and the Aleut communities slid into poverty. Further hardships resulted during World War II, when the residents were moved to an abandoned cannery in Southeast Alaska as part of the emergency evacuation of Aleuts from the Bering Sea. Eventually residents returned to the Pribilofs, were compensated for the unjust treatment and in 1985 commercial seal harvesting ceased. Today, the only hunting allowed is for subsistence purposes. Seal numbers have since rebounded and the Pribilofs' charcoal-colored beaches host a mad scene each summer.

Saint George

Local name for the present village on the island. According to Elliott (1881, p. 19) the first settlement on St. George I. was in 1786, located on the north coast, at Staraya Artil, about 5 miles west of the present location. A short time later a village was established at Zapadni Bay on the southwest coast of the island. In the 1880 Census Ivan Petroff listed "Saint George," population 88 (1884, p. 23); population 92 in 1890. Description: population 264, on N coast of St. George Island, Pribilof Islands.

Saint Paul

Locally named for the island. First occupied about 1788 by Aleuts, who were employed by the Russians in the fur seal industry. Listed in the 1880 Census, with a population of 298, by Petroff (1884 p. 23); population 244 in 1890. Located on S coast of St. Paul Island.

Sanak

Pop. 39. Aleut village reported in the 1890 Census as "Sannak," population 132 (1893, p. 163). The Sannak post office was established in 1909; discontinued in 1953 (Ricks, 1965 p. 56). Located on E shore of Sanak Harbor, on NW coast of Sanak Island.

Sand Point

Pop. 254. Fishing village which obtained a post office in 1891. Its population was 60 in 1920; 69 in 1930; 99 in 1939; and 107 in 1950. Located on Humboldt Harbor, on NW coast of Popof Island, in Shumagin Island

Squaw Harbor

Name published as "Baralof or Squaw Harbor" by Atwood (1911, p21), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Squaw Harbor is shown on a 1953 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) map as being located on the S coast of Unga Island, but in 1966 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reported the current location. Located on E cost of Unga Island, on N shore of Baralof Bay, in Shumagin Islands.

Umnak

Aleut village listed in 1960 Census. Coast Survey steamer McArthur, who made surveys in this area in 1901. Located on Umnak Island, 30 mi. NE of Nikolski.

Unalaska

Aleut village reported as "Illyulyuk" by Lieutenant Sarichev (1826, map 14), Imperial Russian Navy (IRN), on a map dated 1792. R. H. Geoghegan considers the name to be derived from the Aleut word "ilulaq," meaning "dwelling together harmonious(ly)." The village developed into the commercial center of the Aleutians in the 19th century and the name "Unalaska" derived from the island, became popular usage. The village population was 196 in 1831; 406 in 1889; 317 in 1890; 281 in 1910; 299 in 1920; 226 in 1930; 298 in 1939; and 173 in 1950. The Ounalaska post office was established in 1888; name changed to Unalaska in 1898. Located on S shore of Unalaska Bay, Unalaska Island.

Touristy Description: Situated between the Pacific Ocean to the South and the Bering Sea to the North, the Aleutian Island community of Unalaska/Dutch Harbor is rich in history, and for the last twenty years has been the number one commercial fishing port in the country.

Unalaska’s earliest known inhabitants, the Unangan (also know as Aleut) people have continuously occupied these islands for approximately 9,000 years. Artifacts from archaeological digs as well as other cultural items and information can be viewed at the Museum of the Aleutians and at the Ounalashka Corporation office.

Unalaska was established as the first headquarters for the Russian-American Fur Company and cornerstone for the lucrative sea otter fur trade in the early 1820’s. Unalaska’s most prominent landmark, the Russian Orthodox Cathedral of the Holy Ascension of Christ, which was completed in 1896 is the oldest cruciform style cathedral in North America, and is the only remaining indication of the Russian era which began in the mid-1700’s. Overlooking the bay, the church with its onion domes is a photographer’s delight. It is the repository for more than 600 Russian Orthodox icons, books and relics, and is the centerpiece of the community for the descendants of the Unangan/Aleuts that still call Unalaska home.

The impact of WWII in the Aleutians remains one of the most visible features that dot this remote landscape today. Quonset huts, barracks, concrete bunkers and former gun emplacements blend with Unalaska/Dutch Harbor’s modern physical features, providing visitors with a unique opportunity to explore this part of United States history. Less visible but not less important, was the impact on the people of the region. Their plight of being relocated from the islands after the June 1942 bombing by the Japanese and the difficulties they faced upon their return can be discovered by visiting the Aleutian WWII Visitor Center, the Ounalashka Corporation office, and the Museum of the Aleutians.

Unalaska and its International Port of Dutch Harbor sit in the heart of the North Pacific and Bering Sea fisheries. Its status as the only natural deep water port in the Aleutians has made it an important port since the 18th century when the Russian fur traders first sailed here. In the 1920’s and 1930’s, numerous Herring and Cod salteries and several Salmon canneries were active on Unalaska Island. After WWII, the King Crab fishery in the Bering Sea began to develop slowly and the first crab processing plants opened in Unalaska in the 1960’s. The development of the Bering Sea Red King Crab fishery in the 1970’s and 1980’s changed the character of Unalaska from a quiet village of 400 people to a boom town of approximately 4,000. In the mid-1980’s the current Pollock/Pacific Cod fisheries began to build large processing plants in Unalaska and are now the nation’s largest and most valuable fishery. Dutch Harbor is the main delivery port for the crab fleet featured on the Discovery Channel’s hit reality show “The Deadliest Catch.”

Besides the history, cultural opportunities and beautiful scenery, visitors come to Unalaska/Dutch Harbor to play outdoors. These treeless/bear less islands provide many outdoor activities including, but certainly not limited to: hiking, skiing, sportfishing, kayaking, bird/wildlife watching, and wildflowers (including several wild orchids).

Unga

Aleut village reported as "Ougnagok" by F. P. Lutke in 1836. According to Petroff (1884, p. 35) Father Ioann Veniaminov called it "Delarov" in 1833. See Delarof Harbor. The population was 116 in 1833; 185 in 1880; 159 in 1890; 108 in 1910; 313 in 1920; 150 in 1930; 152 in 1939; and 107 in 1950. The "Ounga" post office, established in 1888; changed its name to Unga in 1894; discontinued in 1958 (Ricks, 1965, p. 49, 68). Description: population 43, on Delarof Harbor, on SE Coast of Unga I., in Shumagin Is., Aleutian Range.

 
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